U.C.’s Student Failure

Thomas D. EliasNewsLeave a Comment

Janet Napolitano

As a new school year gets set to open on the nine campuses of the University of California, it’s fair for parents of prospective students to ask once again, as many have for at least the last eight years, whose U.C. will it be? The question first arose during the Great Recession that began nine years ago, just when U.C. … Read More

Leader Newsome Spurns Polls

Thomas D. EliasOP-EDLeave a Comment

Mr. Newsom

Gavin Newsom has a reported net worth of more than $10 million, an ownership interest in more than a dozen businesses from wineries to hotels and a steadfast, almost lifelong friendship with plutocrat Gordon Getty. Yet he is running for governor (and has led the polls since he declared for the office well over a year ago) as an advocate … Read More

Latest Inequality: Bail

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Mr. Elias

There are plenty of problems with the kind of one-party government California now has, with every statewide office in the hands of Democrats, who also hold two-thirds majorities in both houses of the Legislature. It’s easier to pass taxes this way and budget discipline can be hard to find, to name just two. The one-party dominance also allows for addressing … Read More

Brown’s Email Problem

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Mr. Brown

As Gov. Brown travels the nation and world posing grandly as the Anti-Trump and the ultimate champion of the battle against climate change, he’s plainly very conscious of the legacy he will leave behind when he’s termed out for good after next year. An email controversy that has dogged him for almost two years remains and it may sully the … Read More

Trump Chasing Revenge?

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President Trump

Is it political vengeance or merely a Republican President trying to make budget cuts on everything that’s not military? That’s the real question about President Trump’s first budget as it moves through congressional committees en route to becoming reality. It’s a question that reverberates especially on the West Coast, where not just California, but Oregon and Washington, too, voted heavily … Read More

Test for Big Labor

Thomas D. EliasOP-EDLeave a Comment

Mr. Elias

There’s a good chance that using union dues for politics will become harder within a year or two. One thing for sure: Big labor will not easily accept that kind of new reality. Three times in the past 15 years, ballot initiative campaigns led by conservative Republicans tried unsuccessfully to truncate the power and influence of California’s labor unions, both … Read More

Resistance Is Right This Time

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Mr. Padilla

Hand over all the information you have on every voter in your state, went the demand from President Trump’s newly appointed Advisory Commission on Electoral Integrity. That included a list of all registered voters’ names, birth dates, party identification and voting histories, plus the last four digits of all voters’ Social Security numbers. So much for the old-fashioned secret ballot. … Read More

Newsome Fading Already?

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Mr. Newsom

For a long time, it seemed Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom’s unspoken (at least publicly) agreement with Sen. Kamala Harris would bear the fruit he intended – inauguration about 17 months from now as governor of California. \The early-2015 understanding between the two San Francisco Democrats, both with campaigns managed by the same San Francisco political consulting firm, was this: To … Read More

Look, a Proposition That Worked

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Mr. Rosenfield

The 1988 Prop. 103 has saved California consumers more than $100 billion in excessive auto insurance premiums since voters passed it by a slim 51-49 percent margin, probably the reason for an unrelenting legal onslaught by the insurance industry. No one has calculated the accompanying savings in prices for homeowners insurance and other property coverage, but they also have been … Read More

Tuck Returns, Not Torlakson

Thomas D. EliasOP-EDLeave a Comment

Mr. Tuck

Anyone guessing which of 2018’s campaigns for statewide office will be the hardest-fought would be wise to bet on state Superintendent of Public Instruction. That’s the lesson from the springtime runoff elections for two local school board seats little noted outside Los Angeles. But inside Los Angeles, these contests between candidates backed by LAUSD’s main teachers union and those funded … Read More